Copy of Ongoing projects 2018.02.21

Collecting evidence

International colour-emotion association survey

 You can see on this map how many people from each country have so far participated (as of August 2017). The vertical arrow representing the different colours also represents the number of participants.

You can see on this map how many people from each country have so far participated (as of August 2017). The vertical arrow representing the different colours also represents the number of participants.

Which emotions do you associate with colours?

We often use colours and colour names to communicate about emotions (e.g. “I feel blue”). Our colour research team at the University of Lausanne is doing a large multi-national study on colour-emotion association. Do people agree and to what extent does our cultural background determine how we give emotional meaning to colour words?

Ready to participate? Click here and select your native language.


Colour selection tool

 What you can see here is the starting screen of the colour selection tool

What you can see here is the starting screen of the colour selection tool

what colour do you have in mind?

Sometimes, we would like to find a colour that cannot be captured by words. Our colour research team together with  Prof. C. Alejandro Parraga at the Autonomous University of Barcelona have developed an online colour selection tool that helps to find the best match. This intuitive user-friendly tool allows you to quickly visualise any colour that you can imagine and produce on screen.

Check it out here


Limited colour vision

 The two images contrast how the environment (left image) is seen through the eyes of a person with red-green blindness (right image).

The two images contrast how the environment (left image) is seen through the eyes of a person with red-green blindness (right image).

Do colours convey affective meaning of what we see?

Colour blindness (a.k.a. daltonism) describes a limited ability to see the full colour range, most frequently observed in the red-green range. We investigate how this limited colour range also affects (or not) what we perceive and interpret in our environment.


Involving local communities in colour research

 Community testing with Quartiers Solidaires and ProSenectute (copyright Dominique Schluechter, Nele Dael and Elena Arbona Cuesta)

Community testing with Quartiers Solidaires and ProSenectute (copyright Dominique Schluechter, Nele Dael and Elena Arbona Cuesta)

An evidence-based approach to understand colour and well-being in different populations

We like moving our laboratory outside academic walls to engage with different communities. We foster evidence-based knowledge tailored to specific life situations or age groups (older people, inpatients, families, children in day-care or schools, prisoners, etc.). This project aims to boost awareness in the general public and offer a scientific angle in understanding the potential impact of our emotions, beliefs and preferences on everyday colour decisions. Testing different populations helps us to further validate our research findings and discover the effects of age and community, culture, or environment on how we think and feel about colour.


Colour in art

 On the left, you see one of over 2000 self-portraits by A. Henrion (copyright  The Helmut Klewan Collection, Belvedere Museum, Vienna ). We tested which of 20 emotions best represent the depicted facial expression.

On the left, you see one of over 2000 self-portraits by A. Henrion (copyright The Helmut Klewan Collection, Belvedere Museum, Vienna). We tested which of 20 emotions best represent the depicted facial expression.

Does colour influence how we perceive art?

Visual artists and the living arts use colour in their creations such as in paintings or on clothes. The artist likely aims for a display that is closest or matches the desired experience. Colour is likely one ingredient that supports the artist to this aim. In this line of research, we are investigating what emotions people perceive in art, and to what extent colour contributes to this experience.


Matching colour to internal states and traits

 What is the evidence that your chosen colour represents who you are, or vice versa, can a colour represent what personality measures assess?

What is the evidence that your chosen colour represents who you are, or vice versa, can a colour represent what personality measures assess?

Can colour choices tell who you are and what you feel?

Popular media suggests that colour choices reflect one’s feelings or personality. For example, red colour is assumed to represent a colour of activity and anger, thus it must appeal to energetic people. We are collecting evidence allowing us to empirically test such claims by using various types of affect assessment methods (self-report, emotion induction) and personality assessment methods as well as different colour measurement techniques (e.g. colour selection tool).